Shtetl Routes. Vestiges of Jewish cultural heritage in cross-border tourism in borderland of Poland, Belarus and Ukraine

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Shtetl Routes. Vestiges of Jewish cultural heritage in cross-border tourism in borderland of Poland, Belarus and Ukraine

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Biłgoraj - Cultural Heritage Card

Biłgoraj - Cultural Heritage Card

Biłgoraj is a powiat town in lubelskie voivodeship, with 18.000 residents. Located in the north–eastern part of Sandomierz Basin also known as Sandomierz Lowland, near a crossing of roads from Lublin to Tarnogród, Jarosław, and Przeworsk (road No. 835) towards Hungary, and the road from Zamość through Nisko (No.858) to Sandomierz and Kraków. Biłgoraj was founded on the edge of Solska Wilderness, between Czarna Łada and Biała Łada, which near the town merge into a single river – Łada, a tributary river of Tanew, which in turn is a tributary of San. In the pre-partition Poland, the town was under the administrative rule of lubelskie voivodeship.

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In the footsteps of I. B. Singer’s stories

In the footsteps of I. B. Singer’s stories

We invite you to embark on an intriguing trip of literary heritage of Isaac Bashevis Singer – a Nobel Prize laureate, who drew inspiration for his novels and short stories from traditions and lots of small towns lost deep amidst the woods of Roztocze and mosaic fields of Wyżyna Lubelska.

The trail will run through: Lublin - Bychawa - Turobin - Goraj - Frampol - Biłgoraj - Tarnogród - Józefów Roztoczański - Tyszowce - Komarów - Zamość - Izbica - Piaski - Lublin.

Length: 362 km
Duration:
automobile road - 2-3 days
cycle track- 5-7 days

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In the footsteps of painters

In the footsteps of painters

In the footsteps of painters route aims to teach about a rich and diverse culture of shtetls by presenting the painters that lived there, as well as their body of work.

The route painters presents the changes in art which took place on the break of the 19th and 20th century. For a large group of painters the descent was hardly irrelevant, and throughout their artistically active years they referenced the places and circles in which they grew up. They painted townships, and alleys of Jewish streets, praying Jews and other scenes depicting the life of Jewish population. It was not a dominant theme, however. Painters conducted their own artistic searches, and many of them were influenced by various European styles and movements, especially the École de Paris circles. The majority of this artistic group came from shtetls, and some of them, thanks to their talent, hard work and determination became world-class artists contributing to the artistic environments in Paris, London or New York.

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