Shtetl Routes. Vestiges of Jewish cultural heritage in cross-border tourism in borderland of Poland, Belarus and Ukraine

 

Shtetl Routes. Vestiges of Jewish cultural heritage in cross-border tourism in borderland of Poland, Belarus and Ukraine

 

NN Theatre
Berele Lamed-Waw-nik

Berele Lamed-Waw-nik

From Jewish Majses. Stories from Józefów based on the Yizkor-Buch – a commemoration book of Józefów Jews. Shortened, improved and commented by Yaron Karol Becker.

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Carpenters from Józefów

Carpenters from Józefów

E. Fryś-Pietraszkowa, „Udział rzemieślników żydowskich w kulturze wsi. Materiały”, Polska Sztuka Ludowa - Konteksty 1989 t.43 z.1-2. Translation by Wojciech Szwedowski.

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In the footsteps of I. B. Singer’s stories

In the footsteps of I. B. Singer’s stories

We invite you to embark on an intriguing trip of literary heritage of Isaac Bashevis Singer – a Nobel Prize laureate, who drew inspiration for his novels and short stories from traditions and lots of small towns lost deep amidst the woods of Roztocze and mosaic fields of Wyżyna Lubelska.

The trail will run through: Lublin - Bychawa - Turobin - Goraj - Frampol - Biłgoraj - Tarnogród - Józefów Roztoczański - Tyszowce - Komarów - Zamość - Izbica - Piaski - Lublin.

Length: 362 km
Duration:
automobile road - 2-3 days
cycle track- 5-7 days

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Józefów Roztoczański - guidebook

Józefów Roztoczański - guidebook

Ukr. Юзефув, Yid. יוזעפוף

Books printed in Józefów met with resistance from the state and from the rabbinical censorship. In a letter to Zamoyski, one censor called them “highly” sensitive.

Hanna Krall, The Blue, in: There is No River There Anymore, Cracow 2001

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The route of Jewish printeries

The route of Jewish printeries

We invite you to join the route tracing Jewish printeries, which were very important places for Jewish communities. Because of their extraordinary care for books, including the most import one, the Torah, for centuries Jews have been called the People of the Book. Publishing books was even called "awodat ha–kodesh", "a sacred profession". Hebrew printing houses published a Hebrew Bible with commentaries, as well as sermons, ethical and Talmudic treaties, midrashes, Jewish legal codices, and prayer books. A significant percent of the published books was Cabbalistic and Hassidic literature [1].

The beginnings of Jewish publishing on the historical Polish territories dates back to the first half of the 16th century – the oldest printing workshops were founded in Kazimierz near Kraków (1534) and in Lublin (1544–1682). Thanks to beneficial administrative decisions, favourable bishop censorship, and magnates' conviction that founding a printery brought numerous benefits (for instance increased the economic standing of the city, enabled export–oriented production, contributed to educating the residents, increased income) in the 17th and 18th centuries there appeared dozens of new publishing houses: in Biała Cerkiew, Białorożce, Bogusław, Bracław, Dubno, Dubrowno, Korets, Międzyboż, Międzyrzec, Mińkowice, Ostroh, Połonne, Poryck, Radziwiłłów, Szkłów, Sławut, Sudyłków, Zasław, and other places. Despite all of this, until the 19th century their publishing could not compete with a rich selection of books imported for the needs of the Jewish population of Poland.

The 19th century brought a significant change to that. At that time a clear breakthrough in the number of Hebrew and Yiddish publications took place, especially in the Austrian and Russian partitions.

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Yizkor book of Józefów

Yizkor book of Józefów

Sefer zikaron le-kehilat Jozefow ve-le-kedosheha (memorial book to the community od Jozefow and its martyrs), Editor: Azriel Omer-Lemer, Jozefow Societies in Israel and the USA, Published: Tel Aviv 1975 (H, Y 426 pages)

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